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Upwelling Explained

Discussion in 'Questions & Answers: Gain Angling Knowledge' started by fishingfool, Nov 15, 2015.


  1. fishingfool

    fishingfool Lieutenant
    Thread Started By

    Upwelling is an oceanographic phenomenon that involves wind-driven motion of dense, cooler, and usually nutrient-rich water towards the ocean surface, replacing the warmer, usually nutrient-depleted surface water. The nutrient-rich upwelled water stimulates the growth and reproduction of primary producers such as phytoplankton. Due to the biomass of phytoplankton and presence of cool water in these regions, upwelling zones can be identified by cool sea surface temperatures

    In the overall process of upwelling, winds blow across the sea surface at a particular direction, which causes a wind-water interaction. As a result of the wind, the water is transported a net of 90 degrees from the direction of the wind

    In some areas, upwelling is a seasonal event leading to periodic bursts of productivity similar to spring blooms in coastal waters. Wind-induced upwelling is generated by temperature differences between the warm, light air above the land and the cooler denser air over the sea. In temperate latitudes, the temperature contrast is greatly seasonably variable, creating periods of strong upwelling in the spring and summer

    Winds blowing across the ocean surface push water away. Water then rises up from beneath the surface to replace the water that was pushed away. This process is known as "upwelling."

    Upwelling occurs in the open ocean and along coastlines. The reverse process, called "downwelling," also occurs when wind causes surface water to build up along a coastline and the surface water eventually sinks toward the bottom.

    Water that rises to the surface as a result of upwelling is typically colder and is rich in nutrients.

    NOTE FROM BOB: Much more (and very technical) info can be found online. Upwelling does not occur in our area every year. Judging by the above article found online, you would think that the fishing would improve but that is not the case! Some fish are affected by the cooler water. One in particular is the mangrove snapper! Just as we need them! I noticed the water was somewhat cooler this morning at the flat bridge but not enough to affect fishing. The waters on the offshore reefs and around the inlet will be affected more than in the river. The upwelling may only last a day or two or may hang around for several weeks! When I was skippering the Snow White II party boat in 1974 we had an upwelling that lasted for several weeks. All we could catch on the reefs were grunts and small black sea bass!

    All we can do is KEEP ON FISHIN’!
     
  2. Notorious Too

    Notorious Too Cabin Boy

    Good info Bob.....sounds like I've been fishing the upwellings all this time..........at least, that's my story, and I'm sticking to it.... wink.gif
     
  3. bogman102

    bogman102 Seaman

    Thanks for the post Bob. I didn't know there were upwellings in the ocean. It's a common occurrence (spring and fall) in lakes and ponds inland.
     
  4. lobsterman

    lobsterman Seaman Recruit

    Interesting Bob. This will be my non fish catching day excuse from now o.
     
  5. keep it reel

    keep it reel Lieutenant Commander

    Thanks for sharing Bob
     
  6. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member

    Thanks for your helpful information Bob thumbsup.gif
     
  7. Love2Fish

    Love2Fish Petty Officer

    Great information. Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member

    Here are some good videos




     
  9. Good info Thanks.
     
  10. keep it reel

    keep it reel Lieutenant Commander

    Ok Bob, now turn it off!!
     
  11. keep it reel

    keep it reel Lieutenant Commander

    5c336ad796b79859d13766f531b546374860b1b7_r.jpg
    Here is a pic to help show what happens with the upwelling
     
  12. keep it reel

    keep it reel Lieutenant Commander

    I checked online as to the water temp at ponce inlet this morning and it appears to be warming up. Wednesday was 72.2 today is 78. Maybe the upwelling is over and the mangrove bite is on.
    I guess we'll see in the morning.
     
  13. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member

    Just in time for our clubs fish fry thumbsup.gif
     
  14. keep it reel

    keep it reel Lieutenant Commander

    That's what I'm talking about!!!
     
  15. Zak Attak

    Zak Attak Pirate

    Thanks for the info guys.
     
  16. shrimpforbrains

    shrimpforbrains Sailing Master

    PLEASE, turn it off, I can't even get the big bait stealers to bite now
     
  17. paleoman

    paleoman Petty Officer

    A lot of recent Forum posts mentioned upwelling affecting the immediate fishing, so I wanted to learn more. Hope this helps others.....


    upwelling.jpg
    This graphic shows how displaced surface waters are replaced by cold, nutrient-rich water that “wells up” from below.


    Winds blowing across the ocean surface push water away. Water then rises up from beneath the surface to replace the water that was pushed away. This process is known as “upwelling.”

    Upwelling occurs in the open ocean and along coastlines. The reverse process, called “downwelling,” also occurs when wind causes surface water to build up along a coastline and the surface water eventually sinks toward the bottom.

    Water that rises to the surface as a result of upwelling is typically colder and is rich in nutrients. These nutrients “fertilize” surface waters, meaning that these surface waters often have high biological productivity. Therefore, good fishing grounds typically are found where upwelling is common.

    Great Fishing!


    layers.png

    Layers in the Ocean

    Because the ocean is layered. Note that the y axis is ocean depth going down to 2000 meters. The x-axis is percent maximum of either nutrients or oxygen. Notice that near the surface, there is a minimum of nutrients, and an abundance of oxygen. This oxygen does not come from the air. It was created by phytoplankton, the microscopic plants of the sea. They produce more than half of the world's oxygen. Phytoplankton are constrained to the photic zone which is the the top 200 meters at best because they need light for the process of photosynthesis, and light does not penetrate water all that well. Beneath that, the deep ocean is a reservoir of nutrients such as phosphate and nitrate that plants need for food. On land when a plant or animal dies, the remains are returned to the earth, and then taken up by the roots of plants. But in the deep ocean the remains sink below where photosynthesis can use them, and nutrients remain suspended in the deep water. Upwelling brings the nutrients toward the surface. Phytoplankton grow rapidly where and when there is upwelling, then the zooplankton, the microscopic animals, eat the phytoplankton, and fish eat the zooplankton.

    Interesting fact I found: upwelling does not occur during the weather pattern called El Niño and the fishing is terrible
     
  18. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member

  19. Sweep49

    Sweep49 Pirate in the making

    Good info. Thanks for sharing.
     
  20. miller

    miller Cabin Boy

    Thanks for the information.
     

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