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Good To Know Latest Hurricane Information And Preparation: Please Read!!!

Discussion in 'Boating - Anything to do with Boating' started by Nautical Gator, Sep 6, 2017.


  1. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Latest Hurricane Information and Preparation: Please Read!!!

    What to do in-case of a Hurricane - Protecting your Boats, The Dos And Don'ts

    We've analyzed insurance claims over the past 20 years, and discovered the best ways to help you prepare your boat to survive a hurricane.

    There's an old adage that experience is the teacher that gives you the test first, and the lesson afterward. BoatUS Marine Insurance has been collecting evidence of lessons learned — what worked and didn't work when boats were prepared for hurricanes — since the first BoatUS Hurricane Catastrophe (CAT) Field Team was organized after Hurricane Gloria in the fall of 1983.

    blown-over-boats.jpg

    Most skippers know that boats need to be stripped of sails, Biminis, and anything else that's removable and creates windage. Adding extra lines when a boat is in the water is also critical. However, what follows are some lessons that may not be so obvious. It's a good idea to learn them now, before nature gives you the test.

    BEST: Strap Down Boats Ashore
    People who've watched boats that were stored ashore in hurricanes report that jackstands used to support the hulls can be rocked back and forth ever so slightly in sudden gusts. Over time, this movement can work the jackstands out of position, making it more likely that the boat will be blown over. While boats ashore tend to suffer less damage than boats left at docks, the extent of damage ashore can be significant — cracked hulls and broken bulkheads.

    In the past few hurricanes, a technique has emerged that promises to greatly reduce damage to boats stored ashore: Strap them down securely to some sort of secure anchor, such as eyes set in concrete or helical anchors drilled into the ground. With either type of anchor, straps with little or no stretch work best; ordinary nylon line stretches, which can buckle the leeward jackstands. The technique has proven to be so effective, even when storage lots have been flooded, that BoatUS Marine Insurance reduces its policy's hurricane deductible from five percent to three percent for boats that are hauled, anchored to the ground, and prepped to reduce windage.

    BEST: Marinas With Floating Docks And Tall Pilings
    Marinas that are devastated by hurricanes most often choose to rebuild with floating docks and tall pilings, typically 16 to 18 feet tall. Floating docks allow boats to rise and fall with surge without stretching and stressing lines. There have been instances where boats at floating docks have been largely unaffected by hurricanes, while some boats at nearby marinas with fixed docks were badly damaged. If your marina is well sheltered and has floating docks with tall pilings, your hurricane plan may be to strip anything that creates windage and add extra lines.

    swamped-boat.jpg

    WORST: Marinas With Floating Docks And Shorter Pilings
    While floating docks with tall pilings have proved to be one of the best places to secure boats in hurricanes, one of the most vulnerable, paradoxically, is floating docks with shorter pilings. The shorter the pilings, the less likely they'll be able to accommodate the surge; it's not uncommon for every dock — and all of the boats — at a marina to be lifted above the pilings and carried away. That's what happened at Masonboro Marina in North Carolina, as well as Bayland Park Marina in Texas, to cite but two examples, where dozens of boats wound up in battered clumps ashore. If a significant surge is anticipated, boats at floating docks with shorter pilings should either be hauled out of the water or moved to a more sheltered location.

    WORST: Boats At Marinas Protected Only By A Low-Lying Seawall
    Boats at marinas that are protected from a larger body of water by a low-lying seawall or spit of land are especially vulnerable to surge. Once the surge rises above the protection, breaking waves will quickly wreak havoc with boats, no matter how well secured. The only option in these instances is to store boats ashore or move them to another marina or hurricane hole that offers better protection.

    BEST: Storing Boats Ashore On High Ground
    A study by MIT after Hurricane Gloria found that boats stored ashore were far more likely to have survived unscathed than boats stored in the water. Some boats are especially vulnerable, especially small open boats with low freeboard that are likely to be swamped by heavy rains. Note, however, that "ashore" in some low-lying areas might be under five or six feet of water during a hurricane. It's important that boats be stored on high ground — the higher the better — above the anticipated surge.

    WORST: Cramped, Fixed Docks
    Over the past few decades, new boats have been built with increasingly wider beams. The width of marina slips, however, has remained largely the same. If your boat's slip is tight, securing dock lines to accommodate the surge will be much more difficult. Too much slack and the boat will be slammed into pilings; too little slack and the boat won't be able to rise with the surge. True, a nylon line's ability to stretch can help; but the higher the surge, the greater the likelihood the lines will be stressed and broken. There are devices available that can be added to the lines or pilings that can help the boat rise up and down with the surge. Another technique is to use longer lines tied to more distant piling. The best alternatives, however, would be to move your boat to a wider slip, move it to a hurricane hole, or, even better, have it hauled (and strapped down) ashore.

    WORST: Relying On Older Dock And Mooring Lines
    After an especially ferocious storm with hurricane-force winds came blasting through, the Port of Astoria, a public marina in Oregon, required all of the boat owners at the facility to replace their dock lines. Sound unreasonable? It's not. The well-regarded publication Practical Sailor tested older dock lines that had been exposed to several seasons of UV deterioration, dirt, salt, and repeated stretching. The study found that the various lines had lost between 49 and 75 percent of their original strength. A key factor to the rope's deterioration was the loss of the factory-coated polymers that lubricate each fiber. While a good deal has been written about the need for chafe protection in storms, not much has been written about the lines themselves. That's too bad, because the Practical Sailor study indicated that whenever a storm is predicted, it would be prudent to have a second set of "storm dock lines" (sort of like a storm anchor) at the ready.

    hurricane-damaged-boats.jpg

    WORST: Boats On Davits And Lifts
    When asked, "Where wouldn't you want your boat to be during a hurricane?" just about all of the BoatUS CAT Team members said they wouldn't want the boat to be on a hoist or lift. Damage to boats on lifts has been high and includes boats being blown off, bunk boards breaking and spilling the boats, boats grinding against motors and pilings, boats being overcome by the storm surge, and boats filling with rainwater and collapsing the lift. Whenever possible, boats on lifts should be stored ashore or moved to a safer location in the water.

    BEST: Helical Moorings
    One of the more interesting innovations to come out of Hurricanes Bob and Gloria, which clobbered the New England coast 20 years ago, has been the development of the helical anchor, which is screwed into the bottom using specialized equipment and offers tremendous holding power, even when scope is reduced. A study by the BoatUS Foundation, Cruising World, and MIT in 1993, found that a 500-pound buried mushroom anchor could be pulled out with 1,200 pounds of pull (supplied by a 900-hp tug); an 8,000-pound dead weight (concrete) anchor could be pulled out with 4,000 pounds of pull. A helical anchor, however, could not be pulled out and the strain gauge recorded 12,000 pounds of pull — its maximum — before a shackle burst apart. (In an earlier test with a larger tug, a strain gauge registered 20,800 pounds before the hawser snapped.)

    BEST: Dry-Stack Storage Facilities Built After Hurricane Andrew
    Port Marina, a dry-stack facility in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, has received a lot of publicity for its ability to stand up to winds of more than 140 miles per hour. So, too, have River Forest Yacht Centers in Stuart and LaBelle, Florida, whose dry-stack storage buildings are billed as offering boat owners "safe harbor during hurricane conditions." At the same time these dry-stacks are being touted as one of the best solutions to reducing hurricane damage, other dry-stacks have been among the most visible hurricane casualties. In Hurricane Wilma alone, three large steel storage racks with thousands of boats were collapsed by the storm's 115-mph winds. In Hurricane Ike, a dry-stack facility in Galveston, Texas, collapsed and burned. How old is old? In Florida, construction standards in most counties were upgraded after Hurricane Andrew, which means that newer racks — those built after 1992 — are far more likely to have been built with more (and heavier) structural supports.

    BEST: Make Plans Before A Hurricane Warning Is Posted
    This is the granddaddy of all lessons: Make plans before a hurricane warning is posted. If you own a boat in a hurricane-prone area, the first step in developing a preparation plan is to review your dock contract for language that may require you to take certain steps or to leave the marina when a hurricane threatens. Ask the marina manager what hurricane plan the marina has in place. It may be that you can join a "Hurricane Club," which would allow you to have your boat hauled whenever a hurricane warning is posted. Note that BoatUS Marine Insurance will pay half the cost, up to $1,000, to have your boat hauled prior to a hurricane, or moved by a professional to a safer location, or for the professional execution of a hurricane plan
     
  2. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Strap Down Boats Stored Ashore
    People who have watched boats in hurricanes stored ashore on jack stands say the boats are constantly being rocked back and forth, ever so slightly. Over time, the movement can work the jack stands that support the hulls out of position, which results in the boat falling over. In major hurricanes, at least a few of the boats stored ashore at every marina have been blown over. And at some marinas, almost all of the boats stored ashore have been toppled over. While boats ashore tend to suffer less damage in hurricanes than boats stored in the water, the extent of the damage ashore remains significant—broken bulkheads, smashed hulls and, on sailboats, bent masts.

    Granada, Hurricane Ivan
    In the past few hurricanes, a technique emerged that promises to minimize damage from boats being blown over: Strap them to the ground. Doug Hillman at Sebastian River Marina calls securing boats to the ground in high winds "common sense." Scott Watson at Indiantown Marina says they always secure boats to the ground whenever they're stored ashore. He estimates that in Wilma, Frances and Jeanne, the technique reduced the number of boats that were blown over by two-thirds. The same was true of boats at Puerto del Rey Marina in Puerto Rico, Swan Point Marina in North Carolina and at the Hinckley Company Marina in Florida. As Watson said, "Securing boats to the ground damn sure helps."

    The straps accomplish several things. First, they hold the boat more securely against the jack stands, steadying the boat so that there is less movement and less chance of the jack stands working loose. Second, if a jack stand were to topple over, straps will sometimes keep the boat upright or, depending on how the boat is secured, at least soften the impact by providing some restraint as the hull falls over.

    The idea of strapping boats down in hurricanes seems to have arisen spontaneously at several different marinas, from Florida to North Carolina to Puerto Rico. While the idea is the same, no two techniques are exactly alike. Different marinas use different anchors and different straps, with some of the techniques being more sophisticated than others. All have their advantages and disadvantages.

    Helical Anchors Screwed into the Ground – Swan Point Marina, Sneads Ferry, North Carolina and Indiantown Marina on the St. Lucie Waterway, Florida
    Betty Myrick said her husband got the idea from mobile homes: anchors that screw into the ground to provide stability in high winds. He bought the anchors at a local hardware store, screwed them in by hand, and then used straps from a flatbed trailer to secure the boat. Other people at the marina, which houses 80% powerboats, liked the idea and soon it was being widely copied. Before Hurricane Floyd, Myrick said a man came by with a gas-powered drill that put the anchors in quicker and with far less effort. It was crude but it worked. All of the boats with straps and anchors held; others that weren't supported were blown over.

    Indiantown Marina
    Like Swan Point, Indiantown Marina uses screw anchors that are drilled into the ground. Unlike Swan Point, Indiantown Marina houses predominantly sailboats, which have deeper keels so that boats ashore sit up higher and are more vulnerable in high winds. Scott Watson, Indiantown's owner, said they use 4-foot helical anchors with round eyes, which are set into the ground using a posthole digger. He says it takes two men 10 - 15 minutes to install a helix. Boats are then secured with 10,000-lb. ratchet straps, which he says have very little stretch.

    With anchors that screw into the ground, holding power is dependent on the density of the soil. Royce Randlett, who is president of Helix Moorings Inc., a company in Maine that sells helical anchors primarily for moorings, says any soil—no matter how loosely packed—offers at least some resistance and helps secure the boat. Randlett says they buried an anchor in loosely packed "sugar sand" in the Florida Keys and found that a 5 ½-foot screw anchor had 2,600 lbs. of resistance.

    Watson says the anchors at Indiantown are secured into typical "Florida sandy soil" and notes that the longer the anchor has been embedded in the soil, the more holding power it seems to provide. The marina includes two straps per stored boat and will supply more for a fee—$30 per anchor and another $20 for the strap.

    The marina was especially hard hit by Wilma and 33 of its 506 boats ashore were blown over when anchors were pulled out. Several other boats lost jack stands but, thanks to the straps, stayed upright. How many boats would have been blown over without the straps? Watson has no way of knowing for certain, but he estimates that there would have been over 100 and that the damage to each boat would almost certainly have been worse.

    Like Swan Point, Indiantown Marina uses screw anchors that are drilled into the ground. Unlike Swan Point, Indiantown Marina houses predominantly sailboats, which have deeper keels so that boats ashore sit up higher and are more vulnerable in high winds. Scott Watson, Indiantown's owner, said they use 4-foot helical anchors with round eyes, which are set into the ground using a posthole digger. He says it takes two men 10 - 15 minutes to install a helix. Boats are then secured with 10,000-lb. ratchet straps, which he says have very little stretch.

    With anchors that screw into the ground, holding power is dependent on the density of the soil. Royce Randlett, who is president of Helix Moorings Inc., a company in Maine that sells helical anchors primarily for moorings, says any soil—no matter how loosely packed—offers at least some resistance and helps secure the boat. Randlett says they buried an anchor in loosely packed "sugar sand" in the Florida Keys and found that a 5 ½-foot screw anchor had 2,600 lbs. of resistance.

    Watson says the anchors at Indiantown are secured into typical "Florida sandy soil" and notes that the longer the anchor has been embedded in the soil, the more holding power it seems to provide. The marina includes two straps per stored boat and will supply more for a fee—$30 per anchor and another $20 for the strap.

    The marina was especially hard hit by Wilma and 33 of its 506 boats ashore were blown over when anchors were pulled out. Several other boats lost jack stands but, thanks to the straps, stayed upright. How many boats would have been blown over without the straps? Watson has no way of knowing for certain, but he estimates that there would have been over 100 and that the damage to each boat would almost certainly have been worse.

    Helical Advantages: Easily installed and inexpensive. Has the potential to provide significant holding power.

    Disadvantages: Holding power is dependent on the type of soil, which could get mushy in the heavy rainfall of a hurricane. Keel blocking can sink in mud, causing the boat to shift.

    Sebastian River Marina
    Eyes Embedded in Concrete Pavement — Sebastian River Marina, Sebastian, Florida
    Just how well the straps work depends largely on how well they're anchored. A short helical set in loose soil won't hold as well as a longer helical buried in packed soil. At Sebastian River Marina, the straps used to secure the boats are secured to eyes set in concrete. Doug Hillman, Sebastian River's owner, drilled holes into his concrete parking lot and tapped threaded sleeves into the holes. He then screwed eyebolts into the sleeves. As the bolts were tightened, the sleeves spread out at the bottom, which secured the bolts to the concrete.

    Before storms, boats are strapped to the eyes with 5/8-inch, three-strand nylon line. The system works so well that none of the 56 boats, with an average size of 40', stored ashore in Hurricanes Jeanne and Frances were blown over. It is worth noting that the wind was often on the beams of the boats and the parking lot was flooded with two feet of water.

    Advantages of Concrete Pavement: Tremendous holding power.

    Disadvantages: Expensive.

    Chain and Eyes Embedded in Concrete Runners - Hinckley Company Marina in Stuart, Florida And Purerto del Rey Marina in Fajardo, Puerto Rico
    Hinckley Company Marina
    While anchoring boats to eyes embedded in concrete clearly has tremendous holding power, not many marinas have large (and expensive), concrete parking lots. A third alternative for anchoring boats ashore in storms is to use long concrete runners set into the dirt, sand, or gravel parking lot. At the Hinckley Company Marina in Stuart, Florida, the runners are about two feet wide and run the length of the parking lot. Using two-inch nylon straps, the boats are secured to lengths of ½-inch chain embedded in the concrete. The 2-inch nylon straps have a breaking strength of 30,000 pounds and are ratcheted tight to minimize movement. All of the 178 boats at Hinckley were stored ashore and most were held in place by the nylon straps secured to the concrete runners. (A few that were away from the runners couldn't be strapped down.) Three of the boats that were strapped down were blown over in Hurricane Frances and two in Jeanne. According to Hinckley's Gary Rolfe, the ground became so wet that the boats' supports sank into the mud. All but one were repairable.

    Puerto del Rey Marina
    An almost identical system, with long concrete runners, is used in del Rey Marina in Puerto Rico. The only difference is that boats in Puerto del Rey are secured with 3/8-inch galvanized steel cables and turnbuckles. The system was installed after the marina was destroyed by Hurricane Georges and has yet to be tested by a major storm.

    Advantages of Concrete Runner: Quicker to install and less expensive than concrete pavement. Tremendous holding power.

    Disadvantages: Not many. Keel blocking can sink in mud, causing the boat to shift; this could be corrected with gravel or wider supports beneath the keel.

    Gunwale to Gunwale?
    Dave Hillman, the owner of Sebastian River Marina in Stuart, Florida, thinks another solution to the problem of boats toppling over in hurricanes would be to block them gunwale to gunwale in long rows, with blocks of foam between each boat. Boats that are only 8 to 15 feet wide individually would be 50 to 60 feet wide collectively. Even strapping one or two boats together would have a significant advantage over boats that are left to weather a storm individually.
    In addition to strapping them to each other, Hillman would still recommend strapping them to the ground individually using earth anchors or eyes set in concrete. Two considerations: First, Hillman says the yard manager would need to have some feeling as to how the boats are going to go together; placing a boat with towering gunwales next to a boat with low freeboard wouldn't work. Also, the yard would need to have a hydraulic trailer or forklift; a travel lift would not allow the boats to be placed close enough together. The technique would also allow the marina to store more boats in the same area. Hillman calls the idea of storing boats gunwale to gunwale with straps "bulletproof."
     
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  3. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Hurricane Preparation Starts with Three Considerations: Location, Location, Location
    Seaworthy's "Hurricane Warning: A Guide to Protecting Boats and Marinas for Hurricanes" notes that the probability of damage can be reduced considerably by "choosing the most storm-worthy location possible" and making a plan before a hurricane warning is posted. (Sound advice, so far.) The Guide goes on to note that a boat in the water should only be secured in a well-protected marina: "A seawall or sandy spit that normally protects a harbor may not offer any protection in a hurricane."

    May not offer any protection? After spending a considerable amount of time driving to various marinas after Hurricane Isabel, Seaworthy can now safely say that the last sentence is an understatement—a HUGE understatement. Of the thousands of words that have appeared in Seaworthy concerning hurricane preparation, "choosing the most storm-worthy location possible" are the most critical. Does having a boat in a well-protected harbor guarantee safety? Of course not. But the choice of locations is the single most important decision a boat owner has to make before a storm. It dwarfs all others.

    In this issue, Seaworthy looks at three marinas that were in Isabel's path. All are well run marinas; well respected and popular with local boaters. All three have management that clearly had given considerable thought to hurricane preparation. All three, thanks to their staffs and boat owners, had been carefully prepared for Isabel. That's where the similarity ends, however. By the end of the storm, the outcomes at the three marinas were completely different. And the difference was their location.

    Before the Storm: Preparations
    Hartge Yacht Yard
    Three days before Hurricane Isabel was expected to come ashore, Hartge personnel began calling every one of the 297 boat owners at the yard with a brief reminder: Preparing your boat is your responsibility. Details on hurricane prep, owners were told, had been posted at the yard's website.

    Hartge's service manager, Luke Frey, said he had been pleasantly surprised at both the size and intensity of the response; later that afternoon a steady stream of cars began pulling into the yard as owners set to work removing biminis, dodgers, dinghies and sails, and adding extra lines and chafe protection to their boats. Several owners moved their boats to nearby hurricane holes—Mill Creek, Whitehall Bay, and the Severn River . A few others had their boats hauled and blocked ashore. Meanwhile, the normal work routine at the 139-year-old boatyard was suspended as Hartge's 35 employees went to work preparing the docks, buildings and grounds. The frenetic activity continued until Thursday afternoon, when most of the employees headed home, leaving only a handful of volunteers at the yard to wait for the rapidly approaching storm.

    Herrington Harbour North
    Plans for Isabel began on Monday when Isabel was still off the coast of Georgia . Steuart Chaney, Herrington's president, started making plans to prepare the marina with Alex Persons, Herrington's harbormaster. Chaney described the plans the two eventually made as "elaborate." First, all 1,300 boat owners at Herrington North and South were called, and most came to the marina to prepare their boats. Marina staff walked the docks over and over, noting potential problems. Some boat owners were then given a second call. Dozens of boats—a total of 165 in three days—were hauled and blocked ashore. Chaney said anything on the grounds that "could float or fly" was secured by marina personnel. Windows on buildings were covered with plywood. Just as the storm started coming ashore, danger signs were placed at each dock and the power was cut off.

    Jordan Point Yacht Haven
    Further south on the James River , personnel at Jordan Point Yacht Haven had also been calling boat owners. Their message was different: Boats either had to be moved to a hurricane hole or they were going to be hauled and blocked ashore. Boats would not be allowed to remain in their slips during Isabel. The reason, according to Mike Winn, Jordan Point 's owner, was that the docks were too vulnerable; several boats had sunk at their slips when Hurricane Fran skirted the area in 1996 and Isabel promised to be a much bigger storm. Winn said he wasn't taking any chances.

    Several of the owners opted to take their boats to a hurricane hole—a large, well-protected gravel pit further up the James. The remainder were hauled and, by late Wednesday, 80 boats had been blocked ashore in two neat rows facing the water. Slips were now empty. The buildings and grounds had been secured. There was nothing more to do but go home and wait.

    The Aftermath
    Friday morning dawned bright and sunny with nary a hint—as long as you were looking skyward—of what had taken place the night before. The ground, however, was a different story; it was carpeted with leaves, hundreds of branches, debris, and fallen trees. Power lines were down. Homes were damaged. And along the shores of the Chesapeake and its many tributaries, water was just beginning to recede from backyards, marina parking lots, and docks. A boat owner who arrived at Hartge early that morning said he saw a kayak being paddled along a dock that was still well below the surface of the water.

    Even though Hartge sits on relatively high ground, the water had flooded several of the buildings, destroying the paint inventory in the stock room and the welding machine at the yard's rigging shop. As for the boats, a few had been scratched by handholds that jut out from pilings on finger piers, but the damage was minor. Most of the marina's boats were completely untouched. Some of the credit has to go to Hartge volunteers who stayed up all night, first loosening the lines on boats as they rose and then taking up the slack as the surge receded.

    Ultimately, though, the credit for Hartge's success has to go to the marina's sheltered location. The effort by Hartge staff to protect boats, however commendable, would have been impossible at Herrington North or Jordan Point. A seawall that protected the boats at Herrington was overcome by the surge, exposing boats at the marina's A, B, C, and D docks to breaking waves. Large sections of the docks had been destroyed and some of the boats—a total of eight—were sunk. Many more were damaged.

    The worst devastation occurred at Jordan Point. During the night, Isabel's eight-foot surge and six-foot breaking waves destroyed the vacant docks and then rose over the banks, lifting all 80 boats off their jack stands and floating them against a hill behind the parking lot. The boats were then bashed against each other for several hours, leaving them in mangled clumps when the surge finally receded. All were damaged and many were a total loss. A few were broken into pieces and strewn about the parking lot.

    As you might expect, Hartge's Frey was the only one who wasn't talking about major changes, aside from moving equipment to higher ground, after Isabel. At Herrington North, Chaney has begun rebuilding a total of 250 slips with completion scheduled sometime later this summer. A taller seawall will also be replacing the one that was overcome in Isabel. A second seawall, one that will protect the harbor from the southeast, may also be built. Chaney said that the second seawall had been discussed before Isabel and he's confident that the project has the impetus to finally be approved. With new seawalls, boats would be much better protected. If the second seawall isn't built, the only alternative will be to move all of the boats whenever the area is threatened by a hurricane.

    Jordan Point is also rebuilding; the fixed docks are being replaced with floating docks and taller pilings. There will also be a breakwater at the perimeter, although it won't be sufficiently tall to protect the boats in a significant storm surge. Should another Isabel be forecast, the boats likely would have to be moved, although to where or how has yet to be worked out. Mike Winn says he's just thankful to be rebuilding.

    The message to boat owners is clear: "A seawall or sandy spit that normally protects a harbor may not offer any protection in a hurricane"… a few small words that somehow don't convey the message.

    Every Picture Tells a Story

    The boats at this marina on Miller Island , Maryland had all been moved ashore to "high ground." Unfortunately, high ground on Miller Island isn't very high. The surge came over the outer breakwater and breaking waves flooded the surrounding property, wreaking havoc with boats and houses. At one point, the entire island was underwater.

    The Houston Yacht Club
    Perhaps the most famous story of marina destruction, occurred at the Houston Yacht Club during Hurricane Alicia in 1983. A storm surge, pushed by 135-mph winds, combined with normal high tides to overcome the low-lying outer seawall. The protected harbor then became an open bay and all of the boats—a total of 141 boats—in the harbor either sank or were carried ashore.

    As a result of the storm, the Houston Yacht Club put together a remarkably detailed (75 pages) hurricane preparedness plan that must be adhered to by all members. The plan calls for every boat in the outer harbor to be moved or hauled out ashore.

    Jordan Point
    The wind blew across the long, unprotected fetch of the James River (that can be seen under the shed) destroying the docks and sheds.

    Even though all of the boats were damaged, the decision to haul and block them ashore before the storm meant that most would survive. Dan Rutherford, a marine surveyor on the BoatUS Field Catastrophe Team, estimates that 75% of the boats in the parking lot were repairable. Had those same boats remained in the water, all would likely have been bashed against pilings and sunk. Blocking the boats ashore averted another costly problem: pollution from leaking fuel.

    The Floating Docks at Columbia Island Marina
    It's difficult to imagine docks that could be better sheltered than those at Columbia Island Marina in South Arlington, Virginia. The 382-boat marina is located in a basin that is surrounded on four sides by gently sloping banks and separated from the Potomac River by a long, narrow canal. During Hurricane Isabel, the boats at Columbia Island were well protected from storm's wind and waves. The surge, however, was a different story.

    All of the marina's boats are moored at floating docks. During the night of September 19, the surge rose an astounding 14', which in years past would have resulted in widespread damage when docks and boats floated free. But when the docks at Columbia Island were rebuilt several years ago, pilings were driven into the bottom that tower 18' above normal water levels. As a result, Isabel's powerful surge remained a comfortable distance—four feet—from the tops of the pilings. The docks stayed put and none of the boats were damaged.

    Other marinas with floating docks haven't been so lucky. During Hurricane Fran in September 1996, the surge lifted all of Masonboro Boatyards floating piers off their pilings and carried away most of the boats. When the marina was rebuilt the following year, taller pilings were used, which like those at Columbia Island , are 18' above the water. The result is that Masonboro Boatyard is now much more "storm proof."
     
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  4. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    how to secure your boat down in your yard for a hurricane

    Before to hurricane hit last-time - I secured my house with hurricane panels



    and secured my boats.

    I put 4x4's in the ground and some mobile home anchors in the ground and secured my boats to them.

    I disconnect the bilge pump, put the plug in and put some water in the boat to weigh it down. I let some of the air out of the trailer tires, straped the boat to the trailer, then secured the whole boat down to ther ground like show in my pics.



    I also dug a hole and placed each boats anchor in the hole and hooked under the concrete slab. So my boats were anchored down to the ground and not going to be blown around or flipped over.




    I kept my boats on the South side of the house and out of the hurricanes winds which came in from the east, north, and west, the west winds were the strongest.




    I tied the trailer to each other.




    I also let the air out of the tires.


    Then cranked up my generator, the generator used 20 gallons of gas each day which was costing $80.00 a day to operate.








    [​IMG]
     
  5. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

  6. Cbird

    Cbird Rigger

    Thanks for that good advice Sam, I can apply some of this to my situation since I keep my boats at home on trailers .
     
    Nautical Gator likes this.
  7. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

  8. Shrimp Gritter

    Shrimp Gritter Seaman apprentice

    Thanks for the tips, Sam.
     
  9. Cbird

    Cbird Rigger

    Thanks for all the ideas on how to secure your boat for this storm " IRMA ", I was talking to a friend and he mentioned this. If you have your boat at home on a trailer why not fill the inter-bottom with water, this would make it harder to blow over. Of course be careful not to over fill it this would make it to heavy for your trailer. I have a 18 ft. Fiberglass BASS boat & a 16 ft. Alum boat , I am going to try it. WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS Ron.
     
  10. shrimpmansteve

    shrimpmansteve Swabbie

    I have a 19 foot cc. I'd like to hear thoughts on this as well
     
  11. Cbird

    Cbird Rigger

    Years ago [1989] I had a 19 ft. Cobia c/c and it keep tacking on water each time I would take it out and I could not`locate where it was coming in at. So I filled the inter haul with water and I mean filled it until it was at the floor deck let it sit over night. The next day could not find one drop of water leaking out, it was on my trailer all the time so I think I`ll be ok for my boats. BTW The leak came thru a fitting when under way, that boat would do 40 mph plus and of course being YOUNG & Foolish you know how that goes.
     
  12. Keith

    Keith Pirate

    Thank you for the good information.
     
  13. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Hows everyone doing,

    I'm Hurricane prepping my house and boats like in the above photo. Been at it since yesterday. Got food and drinks (or what was left in the stores) the shelf's are bare. Home depot is out of everything including plywood and screws. Fill up 8 five gallon gas cans and both my trucks. Fulled my generator in above photos, and it started right up. (make sure you drain the gas tank and run it till the carburetor runs out of gas before you store it till the next hurricane.) that's why it started right up.

    Members stay safe, I have a generator and battery backup for my computer, modem and phone, so I will be online if my house does not blow away! Smiley Laughing018::1
     
    mkyota1 likes this.
  14. Cbird

    Cbird Rigger

    I am as ready as I can be - grill w/gas, car full w/gas boat has 50 gals in it, generator working ,windows boarded up and food in the pantry , two tubs filled to the top w/water, all I need is to have IRMA make 90 deg.turn to the EAST !!!!!
     
    Nautical Gator likes this.
  15. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    glad you said that you have full tanks on your grill. Same here.
    I will have to add that to the post. Thumbsup1:::1
     
  16. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Hurricane Check List:
    Besides boarding up your house and securing your cars trucks and boats, you will still need:


    Food
    Water
    Drinks
    BBQ grill w/gas
    car / truck with full tanks of gas
    generator - check and make sure it working,
    lots of extension power cords, with surge protector outlets.
    5 gallons gas cans full of gas
    fill you tubs with water, can be used to flush your toilet, wash with etc.
    Battery lighting
    Lighter
    clean laundry and towels

    add to this list below?
     
  17. shrimpmansteve

    shrimpmansteve Swabbie

    Kerosene and hurricane lamps

    Ice chests filled with ice
     
  18. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Don't even think about it

    upload_2017-9-9_5-54-32.jpeg

    upload_2017-9-9_5-57-9.jpeg


    upload_2017-9-9_5-54-57.jpeg
     
  19. mkyota1

    mkyota1 Sailing Master

    I talked with my boss and he let me store my boat in the shop for the storm. I feel much better with it in there then beside my house. 20170909_085458.jpg
     
    Nautical Gator likes this.
  20. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Cool, glad you found a safe place for it, mine are all anchored down. And i am officially 100% hunkered down for the storm. Checked everything twice and have all my supplies that I could think of.

    Be safe members, take and post your hurricane related pics below after the storm.

    Thanks
     
    mkyota1 likes this.

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