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Club Articles Acr Globalfix V4 Gps Epirb - Category 2 - 2831

Discussion in 'Boat Supply, Boat Parts, Boat Information etc…' started by Nautical Gator, May 13, 2016.


  1. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Just ordered the new ACR V4 EPIRB

    Get yours here:
    http://amzn.to/2CfgHif

    If you go offshore and something happens you will wish you had one of these on your vessel.

    I have seen far to many boaters on the news who drifted for weeks without being found in time.

    With the ACR GlobalFix V4 GPS EPIRB it will send out a distress signal and the cost guard will send out a helicopter or ship to come get you fast.

    So for that reason I have always had one on my vessel.

    You will also want to Register it to your vessel

    head_title.png.png

    United States 406 MHz Beacon Registration

    https://beaconregistration.noaa.gov/RGDB/index




    ACR GlobalFix V4 GPS EPIRB - Category 2 - 2831


    ACR-2831-EPIRB-B.jpg globalfixv4_with-brackets-and-new-logo.png

    ditchbag-right-angle-really-pixellated.png




    ACR GlobalFix V4 GPS EPIRB - Category 2 - 2831
    The ACR GlobalFix V4 GPS EPIRB - Category 2 - 2831 is a marine distress beacon with multiple built-in redundancies to increase your chances of survival in an emergency situation. The internal GPS on the ACR GlobalFix V4 GPS EPIRB will pin-point your location, which is transmitted on the 406 MHz distress signal which in the absence of GPS coordinates, can be used to triangulate your position. The beacons 121.5 MHz homing signal will bring local search and rescue forces directly to your position and the EPIRBs LED strobe light will allow them to visually locate your position in low light environments.

    The ACR GlobalFix V4 GPS EPIRB has two functional self-tests to monitor the beacons transmission, power and battery performance, as well as GPS acquisition. Pair these tests up with ACR's 406Link.com optional testing portal andreceive satellite confirmation messages directly to your cellphone or email.
    The user replaceable battery pack in the ACR GlobalFix V4 GPS EPIRB has a 10 year replacement interval reducing the overall ownership cost and making replacement a breeze. Should you ever use the beacon in a life threatening situation, ACR will replace it, Free of Charge. Simply submit your story to ACR's SurvivorClub.com program and return your used beacon for a free replacement.
    ACR GlobalFix V4 GPS EPIRB Features:

    • High visible LED strobe - Energy Efficient
    • Internal 66 channel GPS - Faster acquisition from a cold start
    • High efficiency electronics - Performance you can count on
    • User replaceable bettery - 10 year battery life
    • Professional grade design - Engineered, tested and built for years of
      abusive marine use
    • Simple manual activation - Keypad with protective cover to prevent false
      alarms
    • Uses Search and Rescue Satellites - No subscription fees
    • If you use it...ACR will replace it, FREE of charge - Simply submit your
      story, send ACR back your used beacon, so they can have it mounted on the
      Wall of Fame and ACR will send you a brand new beacon of equal or greater
      value


    ACR GlobalFix V4 GPS EPIRB Specifications:

    • Activation Method: Manually
    • Application: Coastal Cruising, Sailing, Offshore Recreational and
      Commercial Marine
    • Material: High Impact UV resistant polymer
    • Battery Life: 10 Year User Replaceable
    • EPIRB Type: Category 2/Class 2
    • Floating: Yes
    • GPS Enabled: Yes
    • Dimensions: 8.6" x 4.3" x 3.6"
    • Strobe: LED Strobe
    • Transmit Time: Minimum 48 Hours @ -4° (-20°C)
    • Waterproof: 33ft (10m) @ 10 min. Exceeds RTCM standard
    • Weight: 1.63lbs (26oz) with bracket
    • Warranty: 5 years




    2830 GlobalFix™ V4 GPS EPIRB - Category 1

    The GlobalFix™ V4 EPIRB is a marine distress beacon with multiple
    built-in redundancies to increase your chances of survival in an emergency
    situation. The internal GPS will pin-point your location, which is
    transmitted on the 406 MHz distress signal which in the absence of GPS
    coordinates, can be used to triangulate your position. The beacons 121.5
    MHz homing signal will bring local search and rescue forces directly to your
    position and the EPIRBs LED strobe light will allow them to visually locate
    your position in low light environments.

    The GlobalFix V4 has two functional self-tests to monitor the beacons
    transmission, power and battery performance, as well as GPS acquisition.
    Pair these tests up with ACR's 406Link.com optional testing portal and
    receive satellite confirmation messages directly to your cellphone or email.

    The user replaceable battery pack has a 7 year replacement interval reducing
    the overall ownership cost and making replacement a breeze. Should you ever
    use the beacon in a life threatening situation, ACR will replace it, Free of
    Charge. Simply submit your story to ACR's SurvivorClub.com program and
    return your used beacon for a free replacement.

    Features:

    High visible LED strobe - Energy Efficient
    Internal 66 channel GPS - Faster acquisition from a cold start
    High efficiency electronics - Performance you can count on
    User replaceable bettery - 7 year battery life
    Professional grade design - Engineered, tested and built for years of
    abusive marine use
    Simple manual activation - Keypad with protective cover to prevent false
    alarms
    Uses Search and Rescue Satellites - No subscription fees
    If you use it...ACR will replace it, FREE of charge - Simply submit your
    story, send ACR back your used beacon, so they can have it mounted on the
    Wall of Fame and ACR will send you a brand new beacon of equal or greater
    value


    Specifications:

    Activation Method: Out of bracket and wet or manually
    Application: Coastal Cruising, Sailing, Offshore Recreational and
    Commercial Marine
    Material: High Impact UV resistant polymer
    Battery Life: 7 Year User Replaceable (P/N 1104)
    EPIRB Type: Category 2/Class 2
    Floating: Yes
    GPS Enabled: Yes
    Dimensions: 8.6" x 4.3" x 3.6"
    Strobe: LED Strobe
    Transmit Time: Minimum 48 Hours @ -4° (-20°C)
    Waterproof: 33ft (10m) @ 10 min. Exceeds RTCM standard
    Weight: 1.63lbs (26oz) with bracket
    Warranty: 5 years
    Specifications:

    Floats: Yes
    Category: II
    Built-In Strobe: Yes
     
  2. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

  3. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Learn How A Rescue Works

    Emergency

    Position
    Indicating
    Radio
    Beacons
    (EPIRBs) are a must for boaters

    Search and Rescue Process

    anatomy-of-a-rescue---land-sea-air_website_landing_page.jpg

    1. Distressed mariner/outdoor adventurer/pilot activates beacon (EPIRB, PLB, ELT).

    2. Beacon transmits a 406 MHz emergency message containing your Unique Identifier Number (UIN) to the LEOSAR (polar orbiting) and GEOSAR* (geostationary) satellite systems.

    3. The satellites relay the 406 MHz emergency message to a ground station called the Local User Terminal (LUT). The LUT calculates the location of the signal by measuring the Doppler shift caused by the relative movement between the satellite and the beacon and forwards the location to the Mission Control Center (MCC).

    4. The MCC continues to receive information from additional satellite passes and further refines the beacon position (2.3 nm search radius). An alert message is generated that is combined with the registration information from the database and is forwarded to the appropriate Rescue Coordination Center (RCC).

    5. The RCC makes contact with the persons listed in the database to verify the existence of an emergency and gathers additional information about the beacon users. The RCC will dispatch the closest, capable Search and Rescue (SAR) forces.

    6. Local SAR forces launch a rescue mission and use the 121.5 MHz homing signal to pinpoint the beacon.

    * On average, worldwide, this notification (steps 2 through 5) take up to one hour for non-GPS beacons. For self-locating beacons that provide GPS position data in their first transmissions, the search radius is reduced to .05 nm (100 m) and the notification can take as little as three minutes. (Data provided by Cospas-Sarsat.)

    About the Cospas-Sarsat Search and Rescue System
    Orbiting high overhead every minute of the day is a worldwide network of polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites. Together with Russia's Cospas spacecraft, they make up the high-tech international Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking System known as Cospas-Sarsat.

    Cospas-Sarsat has been credited with nearly 30,000 rescues worldwide. The system relies on signals received on the 406 MHz frequency to pinpoint position and speed rescuers to the scene of an emergency on land or at sea.

    In fact, the more reliable, digital 406 MHz frequency has become the de facto internationally recognized distress frequency. Using the 406 MHz frequency, modern signaling devices can quickly beam GPS LAT/LON coordinates to orbiting satellites. This frequency also allows a position fix through Doppler shift to acquire a location even when GPS can't.

    As of February 1, 2009, satellite processing of distress signals from the older 121.5 and 243 MHz emergency beacons was terminated worldwide due to unreliability and false alarms. When a 406 MHz beacon signal is received, search and rescue personnel can retrieve information from a registration database.

    This includes the beacon owner's contact information, emergency contact information and details regarding the specific trip plan and any medical conditions of the owner or members in the party. Having this information allows the Coast Guard, or other rescue personnel, to respond appropriately. NOAA, along with the U.S. Coast Guard, is strongly advising all mariners, aviators and individuals using 121.5/243 MHz emergency beacons to make the switch to 406 MHz in order to take full advantage of the Sarsat system.

    Cospas-Sarsat is maintained and operated by governments all over the world, thus there is no subscription fee required for owning a 406 MHz EPIRB, ELT or Personal Locator Beacon.

    Tags: Cospas Sarsat, 406 MHz Rescue, Search and Rescue Process, Coast Guard Rescue, How a rescue works, Anatomy of a rescue, EPIRB, Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon, Personal Locator Beacon, PLB, Emergency Locator Transmitter, ELT
     
  4. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Emergency Ditch Bags: Insurance for the Unexpected


    What's In Your Ditch Bag



    Electronics For Your Ditch Bag
     
    Shrimp Gritter likes this.
  5. paleoman

    paleoman Petty Officer

    Are you going to mount the device or keep it mobile?
     
  6. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    thats what a ditch bag is for, and I always remove everything out of my boat when at home.
     
  7. Cobia300

    Cobia300 Powder Monkey

    My wife just picked one up for me last month. I feel WAY better when I'm out now. It's well worth the money just for the piece of mind!
     
    Nautical Gator likes this.
  8. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    as far as I go out, it would be like being up the creek without a paddle LOL
     
  9. Shrimp Gritter

    Shrimp Gritter Seaman apprentice

    Can be the difference in making the news as a survivor versus the alternative. Good stuff.
     
  10. Cobia300

    Cobia300 Powder Monkey

    I'm right there with ya!
     
  11. paleoman

    paleoman Petty Officer

    MyFWC
    May 23 at 9:52pm ·

    13243661_10154168101563349_1585673281228429722_o.jpg
    Cool tech that can save your life
    Tip: Take an Emergency Locator Beacon! These devices can be used by boaters to make sure search-and-rescue personnel can quickly find you in an emergency. Some activate when they touch water and some are activated by hand. Both are a great way to ensure help gets to your location quickly! Purchase, register and carry onboard your vessel an emergency locator beacon – either an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) or a Personal Locator Beacon (PLB). This year, if you show you have a registered emergency locator beacon, you can even get a discount on your boat registration!

    More info: www.MyFWC.com/boating
     
  12. Cobia300

    Cobia300 Powder Monkey

    That's good to know you can possibly get a discount as well as being located quickly! Thanks for the info!!
     
  13. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

    Registered my boats last week and received a discount for showing proof of EPIRB registration.

    New Florida boating law goes into effect

    upload_2017-7-7_7-12-44.png


    New boating legislation passed in the wake of two Florida teens who went missing at sea goes into effect Saturday.

    In July 2015, 14-year-olds Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen were lost at sea off the Jupiter inlet. Their boat was eventually found, but a massive search found no sign of the boys.

    House Bill 711, also known as the Beacon Bill, increases and makes permanent a registration-fee discount for boaters who purchase an emergency position indicating radio beacon, or an EPIRB.

    “The boat mounted system can be deployed manually or if the boat were to sink, it has a hydrostatic release, meaning once it reaches a certain depth it would release and start emitting the distress signal,” Sgt. Steven Tacia with the Pinellas County Marine Unit said.

    The U.S. Coast Guard monitors the beacons and is always ready to respond.

    “It’s a direct link to the U.S. Coast Guard,” Petty Officer Michael De Nyse said. “No matter where you are in the world, we have a direct link to you to find you. And it takes the search out of search and rescue.”

    You can also have a personal locator device to qualify for the discount. The devices cost between $200-$500 depending on size.

    “This will bring us to you,” Tacia said. “If you don’t have this and you’re not able to get out on the radio and put out and mayday we don’t know you’re in trouble.”


    Get yours here:
    http://amzn.to/2CfgHif
     
  14. Nautical Gator

    Nautical Gator Forum Captain, Moderator, Peacekeeper Staff Member
    Thread Started By

  15. NauTiKel

    NauTiKel Junior Member

    That coastie swimmer getting back on the helicopter is the best thing I’ve seen in a long time.
     

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